Lions' Luxury Eco Resort & Spa

Website:   http://lionsluxuryecoresortandspa..com 

E-mail:      info@lionsluxuryecoresortandspa.com

Phone:     + 254 746579996

Golf Course Drive

80200 Malindi - Kenya


facebook
instagram
whatsapp
tripadvisor
whatsapp image 2023-03-23 at 17.06.51.jpeg

Safari & Excursions 

 

 

Tsavo East National Park – Amboseli           3-4 DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s plenty of wildlife to enjoy amongst the rugged landscape here. Tsavo East is known for its lions, but there are also leopard, cheetah, buffalo, elephant, impala, zebra and over 500 species of birds in this renowned park.

In contrast to Tsavo’s vast stretches of savannah, Amboseli National Park promises a different safari experience. A smaller and open reserve, the park’s size makes it easier to spot game. Amboseli is known as the best place in the world to view free ranging elephants. It is also framed by the massive vista of Mt. Kilimanjaro – Africa’s highest peak.

Day 1: You’ll know you’re not at the beach anymore when Tsavo’s immense landscape opens before you. There will be time for game drives in the afternoon.

You’ll be sleeping in the park at the safari lodge or tented camp of your choice.

 

 

Day 2 Tsavo East – Amboseli

You’ll arise with the sun and enjoy an early breakfast – then another game drive through Tsavo as we leave the park and head to Amboseli Park. Accommodations for thevening will be at Amboseli and you can lunch and relax there after the drive.

The afternoon will see you traversing the park under the lofty peak of KilimanjaroThere will be plenty of elephant sightings as well as chances to see lion, cheetah, Masai giraffe, zebra, wildebeest and over 300 bird species.

If you wish a visit to a local Maasai Village to meet its people and learn about their herding lifestyle can be arranged. 

Day 3 Amboseli – Malindi

It’s another early day, enjoying the African sunrise and (weather permitting) views of snow-capped Mt. Kilimanjaro as you breakfast.

Another game drive through the park provides final opportunities for wildlife viewing as you depart Amboseli, heading back to the Kenya coast.

Your 3-Day Tsavo East/Amboseli safari includes all ground transportation, accommodation in a choice of economy, comfort or luxury safari lodges/tented camps, park entrance fees, game drives, all meals and pickup/drop off at your coast locations.

 

 

 

ARABUKO FOREST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arabuko Forest is a small part of the largest tract of indigenous coastal forest that survives today in East Africa.
Moreover it has been declared the second most important forest in Africa for bird conservation, and it’s currently considered for the status of a world heritage site.
The two rare and small mammals, shy and difficult to be spotted are considered the stars of the park.

Their name are: Cephalophus adersi and Rhynchocyon chrysopygus.
The first one is also known as the duiker of Zanzibar because it was firstly discovered here, it is a small antelope only 35 cm high, partly nocturnal, which lives hidden in the forest and in pairs; the second 0.5 meters long and almost half of it belonging to the tail, leads a solitary existence and is diurnal habits. This primordial forest is a sacred place for the locals and also the habitat of many wild species, some of which are endangered, such as the golden elephant shrew rump, a small ammal that is usually found in association with a bird, the robin.

 

 

 

 BLUE SAFARI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is possible to organize glass bottom boat trips in Malindi Marine Park or Watamu Marine Park. You can admire the depths of the Indian Ocean and observe marine life in a natural environment and it is possible to snorkel. Your spectacular day ends with a delicious lunch with a mix of grilled fish.

The Blu Safari is an all day long excursion in a glass-bottomed boat. It consists of a boat trip to admire the depths of the coral reef and spot dolphins in the open sea.
At 1.00 am there will be a stop on a small island formed by a game of tides where you can have delicious grilled fish barbecue in the water.
The Malindi and Watamu National Marine Reserve is "the oldest marine reserve in Africa established in 1979 to protect 213 square kilometers of coast, coral reefs and open sea, from Mida Creek to Malindi. The protected area also includes the small National Marine Park of Malindi and the National Marine Park of Watamu, which are among the areas of Kenya most suitable for snorkeling and diving, thanks to over 300 registered species of reef fish and a rich variety of reproduction of embricata, green turtles, liutu tortoises and boreal olive-trees turtle.
The reserve of Malindi or Watamu are the point of departure to start the boat trip.
The stop for snorkeling is right before Sardegna 2 Atoll and the Island of Love visible only in case of low tide. The peculiarity is that you really see the formation of the island. Here you can sunbathe lying on the very white coral sand, refreshing yourself with shallow and clear water.
Blu safari is for everyone: adults and children. Children will be enchanted by the infinite species such as the puffer fish. Its funny behave will amaze you: it become puffier when it’s out of the water because when it is inside its natural environment it has a regular fish size. You will never forget the colours of that day, of that sea, of that fishes.

 

 

 

CHE SHALE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This endless beach of Che Shale offers unusual spectacle, its small nuggets of pyrite gives the illusion of walking on a golden carpet. It is at this location overlooking the Indian Ocean where you can capture the ideal weather conditions to practice this fascinating sport. Along this arae there is a Kite surf school where both beginners and experts can rent surfboard and sail to embark on daring stunts. Kite surfing enthusiasts will be able to use the facilities on rent from the school under the guidance of experts.

Its possibile to go camel ride along the beach. A deliciuos lunch of crab, fresh fish and shellfish, can be tasted in a typical unique natural atmosphere: restaurant roof made of makuti, raffia mats, natural woods, reeds, roots and leaves.

This endless beach of Che Shale offers unusual spectacle, its small nuggets of pyrite gives the illusion of walking on a golden carpet. It is at this location overlooking the Indian Ocean where you can capture the ideal weather conditions to practice this fascinating sport. Along this arae there is a Kite surf school where both beginners and experts can rent surfboard and sail to embark on daring stunts. Kite surfing enthusiasts will be able to use the facilities on rent from the school under the guidance of experts.

Its possibile to go camel ride along the beach. A deliciuos lunch of crab, fresh fish and shellfish, can be tasted in a typical unique natural atmosphere: restaurant roof made of makuti, raffia mats, natural woods, reeds, roots and leaves.

 

 

 

DIVING

 

The Diving Centre is run by an Italian, born and grew up in the Red sea with more than 40 years of experience in Underwater activities.
For more than 20 years, the diving centre has been diving with  experienced divers and beginners to discover the wonderful Kenyan reefs.
You will meet Instructors and Dive Masters to conduct PADI Courses at all levels from Discover Scuba Diving up to Assistant Instructor.
To add that the centre conduct the following specialities: Underwater Digital Photography, Underwater Navigator, Project AWARE, Coral Reef Conservation, Peak Performance Buoyancy, Wreck, Underwater Photographer, Night Diver, Search and Recovery and Equipment Specialist.

Kenya is not only savannah but also the splendid scenery of the Indian Ocean with its very rich coral barrier and an incredible variety of marine fauna.

These are the diving excursions organized:

  • - in the Marine Parc of Malindi, from July to mid-November and from the end of March to April, starting at the Tropical Village;
  • - in the Marine Parc of Watamu from mid-November to mid-March.

The centre, in order to make the diving excursions secure and entertaining, will form groups of maximum 4 divers who will be accompanied by expert guides.

The water temperature is between 24°C and 29°C.

The gas cylinders are filled securely with compressors from BAUER and COLTRI.

The centre utiliyes didactic material from PADI and has complete CRESSI equipment for more than 40 divers.

Diving sites not to lose:

  • PAPA POINT: Diving in currents, about 20 minutes by boat from Malindi. You might encounter schools of big barracuda fish, of turtles, morays, rays, crocodile fish, lobsters and white fin sharks of the barrier. There are also jack fish and giant groupers.
  • BLACK CORAL: 20 minutes by boat from Watamu. Diving site is only suitable for the most expert divers. A really spectacular scenery, black coral, red sea fan, giant candelabrum sponges which are home to big lion fish and the rare sea watermelons (holuturia pallone) of a flashy violet and yellow. Often you can see manta fish and other fish of big dimensions.
  • BRIAN CORAL: 15 minutes by boat from Watamu. A diving site suited for all levels, with schools of jack fish, "luxianides", leopard and rhino morays, sea eels and not so rare is the encounter with the whale shark and the dolphins. Incredible the variety and the quantity of colourful fish.
  • TEWA 25 minutes by boat from Malindi. Diving site suited for all. At a depth of maximum 10 metres the encounter with a varied quantity of barrier fish, anemones, monkfish and big lobsters.
  • CANYON:  Spectacular diving site about 10 minutes by boat from Watamu. At 20 metres depth you cross a big canal where you can encounter leaf-fish, rays, napoleon wrasses, white fin sharks and, sometimes, the rare toadfish.
  • CRACAS: 25 minutes by boat from Watamu. Characterized by the presence of big morays, jack fish, schools of blue file fish (red teeth). Not rare is the encounter with the parrot fish.
  • DRUMMER REEF: 15 minutes by boat from Watamu. Diving along a canal you reach a garden of anemones where parrot fish of any colour and dimension reside. You can dive down up to 32metres and often see fish of big dimensions.
  • TURTLES POINT: 25 minutes by boat from Malindi. You dive on a long reef at a depth between 10 and 16 metres. Rich with fish, spiral shaped sea plants and sea slugs, as well as a big number of sea turtles. Diving characterized by currents.

 

 

 

FALCONRY, Malindi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Falconry of Kenya is a beautiful private zoo featuring an extensive collection of birds of prey and other animals. It is located in Malindi off Lamu Road. At the falconry, you can see falcons and eagles at close range and watch them perform thrilling flight shows. Most of these birds have been rescued and rehabilitated, and some cannot return to the wild.
The falconry of Kenya presents several exciting options for the entire family. You can choose to walk around the falconry, exploring the various enclosures and their creatures. You’ll see eagles, falcons, owls, goshawks, and peckers. You can opt to carry some of them on your gloved hand with the help of a guide for an adventurous experience. In addition to birds, the site has crocodiles, tortoises, monkeys, monitor lizards, and a snake enclosure that parades green mambas, pythons, and cobras.
Get to see a 200-year-old giant tortoise, one of the most fascinating animals in the falconry, and feed the tortoises with bananas.
 

 


Gede Ruins, Watamu

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gede Ruins is a 12th Century Swahili village that was mysteriously abandoned some 600 years ago. It is now a National Museum, and the ruins are heavily overgrown with beautiful indigenous forest trees, baobabs and tamarind. Well worth a walk and a visit. Look out for Syke's Monkeys, and the Golden Rumped Elephant Shrew can also be seen here. A quiet, careful look in some of the old wells can turn out the odd owl, too. The ruins of Gede are the relics of one of the Arab-African settlements found along the East-African coast. These towns were built by the Swahili people during the 15th and 16th century. By that time the Swahili people had already established trade contacts with countries in the Middle East and India. Experts suppose that at its peak of prosperity about 2,500 people lived in Gede. There are still various speculations why the town was abandoned during the 16th or 17th century.

However, after Gede was abandoned, it remained undisturbed and nature had the time to re-conquer the place. The ruins at Gede were rediscovered in the 1920s and gained the status of Historical Monument in 1927. Since then about 18ha of the site have been excavated and the remains of several mosques, a palace, residential houses and elaborate pillar tombs have been revealed. Because it is hidden in deep forest the site is very atmospheric and mysterious.

Taking a guided tour through the ruins and the museum will teach you a lot of interesting things about the fascinating culture of the Swahili people and the ancient town they constructed. Additionally, you can walk along the nature trail network which comprises 40 different species of plants and leads to lesser ruins throughout the forest.

Gede Ruins is also an excellent place to observe wildlife. Forest birds like Turacos, Malachite Kingfishers, Paradise flycatchers and African Harrier Hawks can be seen from the tree platform which was built for the A Rocha's Arabuko-Sokoke Schools and Eco-tourism Scheme (ASSETS) programme.

The Gede Ruins National Monument & Museum is open to public daily from 7 am to 6 pm.
 

 

 

KILIFI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you heard of bioluminescence? This is the emission of light by a living organism. It occurs widely in marine vertebrates and invertebrates, as well as in fungi and some terrestrial invertebrates such as fireflies. The journey to watch the magical bioluminescent planktons glowing up the ocean at night at Kilifi Creek. Waiting for the night, we suggest a succulent dinner based on local oysters in a characteristic restaurant on the banks of the creeck.

 

 

 

MARAFA - HELL'S KITCHEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marafa Hell’s Kitchen is one of the best-kept secrets along the Kenyan coast. A hidden gem that stands in magnificence, leaving anyone who sees it in awe. This hidden gem is located 40km from Malindi, in the quiet town of Marafa. The place is known locally as “Nyari” which translates to “The place broken by itself”. This is because the depression formed naturally over thousands of years through harsh weather. Surprisingly, the gorges often take shapes as if someone sculpted them.
Today it is a beautiful sandstone canyon with colourfully layered gorges. The colours range from white, pink, orange and crimson making it a wonderful sight especially at sunset. In fact, the place earned the name hell’s kitchen because it can get up to 50°C during the day, according to the tour guide. It takes around 45 mins to drive from Malindi town. There are many legends that are told to explain how it was formed. The guide told me that according to his grandfather, the land was once owned by a rich man. He owned much livestock, as well as many wives and children. He was arrogant and boastful. To separate himself from the rest of the community, he and his family started bathing in milk, since he had plenty. Leaving the rest of the community languishing in poverty. Because of their extravagance, the gods were angered by this and sent an earthquake that destroyed his home. Thereafter, the bodies of his family were dragged to the sea to be fish food. That is why the gorge is coloured. White represents the milk, red represents the bloodshed and the other multiple colours represent the household items. Being at the canyon is peaceful and you should make sure you add it to your list. Sit down, order a drink and watch as the sun sets on the beautiful canyon. If you are lucky you will get to see the baboons that have made the canyon their home.

Open hours: 6AM – 7PM

 

 

 

MASAI MAARA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Masai Mara is a must-see for every safari traveller. Take to the crystal blue skies for a birds-eye-view of the golden African plains and its many inhabitants. For a more up close and personal encounter, embark on a thrilling jeep safari among the area’s lions, elephants and other wildlife. The Masai Mara National Reserve & conservancies never fail to entice and excite. The quintessential African safari dream.
Ask someone to describe their dream of going on an African safari and you’ll probably hear the same answer nine out of ten times. People dream of being in awe by wildebeest-spotted savannahs, of having their breath be taken away by unexpected lion encounters and of having their hearts thump in excitement while watching a thrilling chase between predator and prey. One of the best places on earth to have this African safari dream come true in the Masai Mara National Reserve and conservancies.

Why visit Masai Mara?
Close your eyes and envision a gentle rolling savannah stretching out as far as the eye can see. Imagine countless wildebeest and zebras grazing lazily right there in front of you. The feeling is humbling and inspiring all wrapped into one. The Masai Mara is known for the highest concentration of wild animals in the world. More than 40% of Africa’s larger mammals can be found here. However, there’s more to the Masai Mara than endless plains. Aside from the main Masai Mara National Reserve proper there are a dozen community conservancies, several group ranches and quite a few Maasai villages in the area.

Masai Mara conservancies
The Greater Masai Mara area is made up of the Masai Mara National Reserve, an unfenced reserve where animals are free to roam, but it also consists of several conservancies. These pieces of land are privately owned by Maasai families. Safari lodges lease the land from the Maasai which gives these Maasai families the chance to invest in their communities by funding education or development initiatives. From time to time you will see Maasai farmers and their grazing cattle at the conservancies. The introduction of these conservancies has been a win-win situation for the environment and the Maasai. Land that was once overgrazed by cattle is now being rewilded and the Maasai can invest in their communities through their earnings from the conservancies. Learn more about the different Masai Mara conservancies.

The Great Migration in Masai Mara

Every year from July through October, the Masai Mara becomes the backdrop of one of the most spectacular wildlife shows on earth - the Great Migration. The sight of so many animals dotting the plains is almost inconceivable. The rolling savannah’s sunburnt grasses become home to more than 1.5 million zebra, wildebeest and antelopes trekking from the Serengeti to the Masai Mara in search of greener pastures and water. The Great Migration is unique to the Serengeti and the Masai Mara. There is nothing else quite like it. There are no guarantees, but if you would like to witness this breathtaking spectacle at the Masai Mara keep the following in mind:
Mid July: the herds enter the Masai Mara and embark on their fateful Mara River crossing. Crocodiles and hippos living on the banks of the Mara River are only two of the dangers the wildebeest and zebra encounter upon crossing the river.

September – October: this is the time of year in which you will see a mindblowing number of wildebeest enjoying the feasts of their labor on the endless plains of the Masai Mara.

African Big Cats
During migration season African big cats come to life. The endless stream of migrating prey offers the big cats a seemingly endless buffet of meal options. Lions, leopards and cheetahs grow stronger during this time of year and are able to have healthy little ones with plenty of food to grow. There are quite a few lion prides in the Masai Mara that have lived in the area for decades. Females are permanent members of the pride, however the male lions tend to get chased out of the group by other male lions. At night you may even hear a deep roaring of male lions warning other males to stay away from their territory. For the best chance of seeing a lion on the prowl in search of prey, head out on an early morning or late afternoon safari and you may see one of the females in action. Learn all about wildlife in the Masai Mara.

Masai Mara landscape
The Masai Mara was named in honour of the Maasai people, the ancestral inhabitants of the area. The word 'Mara' means 'spotted' in the Maasai (Maa) language. Upon visiting the Masai Mara, it won’t be hard to understand how this area got its name. The short bushy trees that dot the landscape do give it a kind of 'spotted' look. The Greater Masai Mara ecosystem is massive. It amounts to almost 1510 square kilometers. The area is bordered by the Serengeti in the south and to the north, east and west lie Maasai ranches. Although the riverbanks of the area’s three rivers (The Sand, Talek River and Mara River) are lined with shrubs and trees, most of the reserve is made up of open grassland spotted by an occasional flat-topped acacia tree. There are two distinct rainy seasons in April – May (the long rains) and in November – December (the short rains).

History of the Masai Mara
The Masai Mara has only been a wildlife sanctuary for approximately 50 years. It was originally established in 1961 and at the time it consisted of only 520 square kilometers (which included the Mara Triangle). Later the amount of land covered in the sanctuary expanded and in 1974 the area received National Reserve status. A portion of the land was returned to local communities and currently the Mara ecosystem consists of 1,510 square kilometers. The Maasai people have always relied on their land to feed their cattle and to provide their families. Thanks to the establishment of the reserve as a protected area for the conservation of wildlife and wilderness and the areas designated as conservancies, the Maasai are able to sustain their way of living and improve their quality of life.

 

 

 

MIDA CREEK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mida Creek is a natural entrance in the coast about 5 km deep south of Watamu which stands out from the surrounding nature for a completely different fauna and flora creating a unique ecosystem.
Mida Creek has been designated by UNESCO as Biosphere Reserve, because it is here that one of the largest mangrove ecosystems in the world is preserved: there are nine types, with thirty-three species of algae. With the Arabuko Sokoke forest, Mida Creek has been designated the second largest ornithological reserve in Africa.
A research indicated that the mangrove forest and other marine resources are a great economical, ecological and environmental resource for the local village communities.
The forest provides construction timber for houses and boats, firewood and coal.
Minor uses of mangrove products include medical and pharmaceutical applications, tanning material and furniture production. Today, with its shallow fjords, ruled by the tides and protected by a tangle of rhizomes that seem to want to prevent any human passage, this large marine lagoon, a comfortable bed of aquatic plants (of the genus Posidonia) and corals, is a labyrinth of waterways where the Indian Ocean is wedged forming several small islets. Mida Creek is home for many fish species and a feeding site for sea turtles.
Moreover it has been designated by UNESCO as Bird International Zone, sixty-five species of birds live there, some are settled other are nomads, storks, herons and you can find pink flamingos.
There are several ways to visit Mida Creek.
On a boat, crossing these channels to discover the vast multitude of birds that inhabit the surrounding jungle.
Alternatively you can visit the lagoon on foot, walking along the bridge, which cross a part of the lagoon and which is not by chance called the Indiana Jones bridge.
The lagoon is also an incredible destination for kayak and canoe, with endless small canals and passages through the mangroves to explore. You can also take a paddle board.

 

 

 

Robinson Island Excursion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The island of Robinson is a tropical paradise located about 40 km north of Malindi, one of the few places in Kenya that allows you to enjoy unspoiled nature and enjoy a lunch based on the characteristic red crab by Robinson, for a day entirely dedicated to relaxation.
All there is to do here is to be lulled by the waters of the sea and admire the expanses of fine white sand, crystal clear water and the blue sky: the island of Robinson, in fact, is a pristine environment where it is a lush equatorial vegetation to lord it and where there is only a small fishing village, a school and a charming African-style restaurant.
PROGRAM
Departure directly from your accommodation at 9.30am. Cross Malindi and continue towards Che Shale, also known as “Golden Sand” for its shoreline that takes on the color of gold, where you can make a first stop to discover one of the most beautiful beaches on the coast. Then continue to Ngomeni, where there is the salt factory, a large expanse of salt marshes rich in shrimps and pink flamingos, which can be admired along the way.
We proceed towards the island of Robinson, crossing a dirt road that runs along the salt lake of Gongini, a place frequented by many species of birds including herons, egrets and flamingos.
We leave the car near a lagoon, where there is a certain “Caronte” who, with his canoe, ferries tourists into the fantastic landscape of the island. Sometimes, due to the low tide, the island can be reached on foot through the mangrove lagoon. Once on the island, waiting for lunch, you can relax on the beach or take a walk to the fishing village. Lunch is served in a charming typical African restaurant, built with makuti roof, trunks, mangrove roots, reeds and sand floor, with rice based menu with octopus sauce, giant red crabs typical of Robinson Island, coconut-flavored local clams and oysters, grilled fish, tropical fruit and the typical Arabic coffee. After lunch, sofas and hammocks are available for a bit of relaxation, until around 3.00 pm, when you leave the island. 

 

 

 

STAGE PARK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adventure Park 12 km from Malindi, on a hill with an enchanting view. In the park the turrets with the Tibetan bridges and the various paths stand out, and a zipline of over 600 meters in total, with a breathtaking view. Guided bike tours are organized in the savannah passing through the villages up to the Galana river promontory. There is a restaurant / bar with a panoramic terrace.

 

 

 

 SAFARI TSAVO EAST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsavo National Park is Kenya's largest national park. Tsavo is made up of two separate parks, Tsavo East National Park and Tsavo West National Park. Located in Coast Province of Kenya in between Nairobi City and Mombasa. Tsavo is nearly 22,000 km2, being the largest national park in Kenya and one of the largest in the world. The park was split into two due to the railway going from Mombasa to the interior of Kenya.

Accommodation: There are plenty of places to stay in the two parks. These range greatly and most of them have a water hole close to the property making game viewing easier. Tsavo East National Park is one of the oldest parks in Kenya, located South East of Kenya near the Town of Voi in the Taita-Taveta District of Coast Province, inland from the Coast, it is 13,747 sq.km. While the Tsavo West National Park is also located in the Coast Province of Kenya covering an area of 9,065 sq.km. The park was opened in April 1948. The slightly larger Tsavo East is generally flat, with dry plains across which the Galana River flows. Other features include the Yatta Plateau and Lugard Falls. 

Tsavo West Features

Tsavo West National Park is more mountainous and wetter than its counterpart, with swamps, Lake Jipe and the Mzima Springs. It is known for bird life and for its large mammal’s e.g. black rhino, Cape buffalo, elephant, leopard, hippo and Masai lion. There are also other smaller animals that can be spotted in the park, such as the bush baby, hartebeest, lesser kudu and Maasai giraffe.

Access: The parks can be accessed through several gates. Tsavo East can be accessed trough Manyani Gate, Voi Gate, Buchuma Gate and Sala Gate. 
Here Elephants are common, and their red dust coating makes them stand out against the arid environment. Of the big cats, lions are most easily spotted. Buffalo, zebra and plenty of Masai giraffes are some of the other animals you can expect to see.
Tsavo East has a good range of unusual antelope. This is one of the few places to see the fringed-eared oryx. The lesser kudu is very shy, but can sometimes be seen darting off into the bushes. The long-necked gerenuk can be found standing on its hind-legs to reach the sparse foliage of trees and bushes. With some luck, you might spot the critically endangered hirola or Hunter's hartebeest.
Best Time for Wildlife Viewing
Tsavo East can be visited throughout the year, but the best time for wildlife viewing is from June to October – in the Dry season. During this season, the vegetation is thinner, and animals congregate around predictable sources of water.

 

 

 

Tsavo West National Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            
 Tsavo West national park like its counterpart Tsavo east National park are the two national parks that form the great Tsavo National park. The park is known as “ Land of Lava, Springs, Man-eaters and Magical Sunsets”. Its popularity is based on the man eating lions that killed hundreds of people during the construction of the Railway line and the highway during the colonial era.  Tsavo West national park is the second largest national park in Kenya covering an area of 9,065 square kilometres. Its separated from Tsavo East national by the A109 highway that connects Nairobi to Mombasa. The park is also a home of over fifty million gallons of crystal clear water that comes from under parched lava rock. The park is more scenic than Tsavo East national park with rouged mountainous areas. The Mazima springs and the Shetani lava flows are unique attractions found at the park. Tsavo West national park is wetter than Tsavo East national park.
The park is among the oldest national park in Kenya, it was established in April 1948 alongside Tsavo East National park. It was named after the magnificent Tsavo river which is the main river that drains the park. Its one of the strongholds of biodiversity across the world.  
Tsavo West national park is more popular due to its scenic beauty that is characterised by the wide range of vegetation. The park is adjoining the great wildlife ranches where the Black and White Rhinos are found. The park is covered by the open savannah grassland dotted with Acacia woodlands, Scrublands, Rocky ridges and the Riverine vegetation. Its remotely located at the coastal province. It’s a home of all African big game especially the African big five which include: Lions, Elephants, Buffalo, Rhinos and the shy Leopards. The other big game found at the park are:
Giraffes, Zebras, hyenas, cheetahs, hippos, crocodiles, Gerenuk, Lesser Kudu, Waterbucks, wildebeests and others. The parks also hosts a good number of bird species especially the rare birds like Corncrake, Basra reed warbler, secretary bird and many others.
Location of Tsavo West national park
Tsavo is located in the South Eastern part of Nairobi along the Nairobi Mombasa highway. Its found in 240 kilometres from Nairobi following the main Nairobi –Mombasa A109 highway. From Mombasa its only few hours driver covering a distance of 250 kilometres.  Its found in the former Taru Desert which is dominated by semi-arid climatic conditions. These climatic condition has led to the scares human population in the area hence giving the animals a wide space of vacant land to occupy.
Attractions in Tsavo West national park
There are several attractions that are found in this large national park that travellers go and experience. It’s a true wildlife wilderness where guests get that feel of African wilderness. Below are the highlights of the parks attractions:
Mzima Springs: The Mazima Springs is the sight of fifty million gallons of crystal water that originates from underground of the parched lava rocks. This is the great place of sightseeing not only in Kenya but entire Africa. It’s a miracle place as you see white crystal water coming from underground. This is one of the unmissable attractions in Tsavo West national park. This is where the park got its nick name “ Land of Lava, Springs, Man-eaters and Magical Sunsets”.
Mammals: The park is regarded as true wilderness of Africa, a land of Man-eaters the lions.  It’s a home of large herds of African big game like lions, leopards, black and white Rhinos, yellow baboons, giraffes, gazelles, hyenas, impala, jackals, foxes, wildebeest, cheetahs, Elephants, buffalo, African wild dogs and others.
Birds: The park has a record of over 400 bird species including the rare birds in the country. Birding is enjoyed along the Ngulia hills, the park is also a bird migratory route. The bird ringers always come to the park around October and January each year. The long list of the bird species is achieved with long holidays at the park like River warbler, Marsh warbler, red-backed Shrike, Eastern black-headed oriole, African finfoot, Corncrake, starlins, Golden pipit and many more.
Poachers lookout: The poacher’s lookout is a hill found at the centre of the park which gives you 360 degrees view of the park. It was named after its popular use by the poachers to view the wildlife at the park. From the time poaching was eradicated at the park, the hill has retained its name and popularity. 
Ngulia Sanctuary: This is a unique sanctuary where the rare and endangered black rhinos are found in Tsavo west national park. This sanctuary hosts the overwhelming growing population of black rhinos in Kenya.
Tsavo West national park is among the African destination where you can achieve your dream of viewing the great wildlife experience. 
Tsavo West national park like its counterpart Tsavo east National park are the two national parks that form the great Tsavo National park. The park is known as “ Land of Lava, Springs, Man-eaters and Magical Sunsets”. Its popularity is based on the man eating lions that killed hundreds of people during the construction of the Railway line and the highway during the colonial era.  Tsavo West national park is the second largest national park in Kenya covering an area of 9,065 square kilometres. Its separated from Tsavo East national by the A109 highway that connects Nairobi to Mombasa. The park is also a home of over fifty million gallons of crystal clear water that comes from under parched lava rock. The park is more scenic than Tsavo East national park with rouged mountainous areas. The Mazima springs and the Shetani lava flows are unique attractions found at the park. Tsavo West national park is wetter than Tsavo East national park.
The park is among the oldest national park in Kenya, it was established in April 1948 alongside Tsavo East National park. It was named after the magnificent Tsavo river which is the main river that drains the park. Its one of the strongholds of biodiversity across the world.  
Tsavo West national park is more popular due to its scenic beauty that is characterised by the wide range of vegetation. The park is adjoining the great wildlife ranches where the Black and White Rhinos are found. The park is covered by the open savannah grassland dotted with Acacia woodlands, Scrublands, Rocky ridges and the Riverine vegetation. Its remotely located at the coastal province. It’s a home of all African big game especially the African big five which include: Lions, Elephants, Buffalo, Rhinos and the shy Leopards. The other big game found at the park are:
Giraffes, Zebras, hyenas, cheetahs, hippos, crocodiles, Gerenuk, Lesser Kudu, Waterbucks, wildebeests and others. The parks also hosts a good number of bird species especially the rare birds like Corncrake, Basra reed warbler, secretary bird and many others. 
Tsavo is located in the South Eastern part of Nairobi along the Nairobi Mombasa highway. Its found in 240 kilometres from Nairobi following the main Nairobi –Mombasa A109 highway. From Mombasa its only few hours driver covering a distance of 250 kilometres.  Its found in the former Taru Desert which is dominated by semi-arid climatic conditions. These climatic condition has led to the scares human population in the area hence giving the animals a wide space of vacant land to occupy.
There are several attractions that are found in this large national park that travellers go and experience. It’s a true wildlife wilderness where guests get that feel of African wilderness. Below are the highlights of the parks attractions:
Mzima Springs: The Mazima Springs is the sight of fifty million gallons of crystal water that originates from underground of the parched lava rocks. This is the great place of sightseeing not only in Kenya but entire Africa. It’s a miracle place as you see white crystal water coming from underground. This is one of the unmissable attractions in Tsavo West national park. This is where the park got its nick name “ Land of Lava, Springs, Man-eaters and Magical Sunsets”.
Mammals: The park is regarded as true wilderness of Africa, a land of Man-eaters the lions.  It’s a home of large herds of African big game like lions, leopards, black and white Rhinos, yellow baboons, giraffes, gazelles, hyenas, impala, jackals, foxes, wildebeest, cheetahs, Elephants, buffalo, African wild dogs and others.
Birds: The park has a record of over 400 bird species including the rare birds in the country. Birding is enjoyed along the Ngulia hills, the park is also a bird migratory route. The bird ringers always come to the park around October and January each year. The long list of the bird species is achieved with long holidays at the park like River warbler, Marsh warbler, red-backed Shrike, Eastern black-headed oriole, African finfoot, Corncrake, starlins, Golden pipit and many more.
Poachers lookout: The poacher’s lookout is a hill found at the centre of the park which gives you 360 degrees view of the park. It was named after its popular use by the poachers to view the wildlife at the park. From the time poaching was eradicated at the park, the hill has retained its name and popularity. 
Ngulia Sanctuary: This is a unique sanctuary where the rare and endangered black rhinos are found in Tsavo west national park. This sanctuary hosts the overwhelming growing population of black rhinos in Kenya.
Tsavo West national park is among the African destination where you can achieve your dream of viewing the great wildlife experience.    

 

 

 

    Vasco da Gama pillar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vasco da Gama pillar: The Kenya, Port

 

 

 

The Vasco da Gama pillar in Malindi is perhaps the most prominent physical reminder of the Portuguese influence in Kenya.
The town dates back 600 years ago and the Vasco da Gama pillar remains one of the few remaining European monuments along the Coast of East Africa.
Vasco da Gama was on a world exploration tour that took him round the Atlantic Ocean to the Cape of South Africa before landing in Malindi and eventually India in the 1490s.
On arrival in Malindi he found the Sultan who welcomed him. He constructed the Vasco da Gama pillar and a chapel for his entourage.
At the Malindi Museum, a librarian told The Standard that Malindi was already trading with the outside world by the time Vasco da Gama arrived.

“When he (Vasco da Gama) and his team arrived, the Sultan gave them provisions and someone to show them the sea route to India and on his return and as a sign of appreciating the Sultan courtesy he build the pillar. In their sailing tradition, the Portuguese team built such monuments, and one was built at the Cape of Good Hope but it went down,” she said.
She added that the pillar is the only remaining monument and according to recorded history it was built at the Sultan’s palace and later relocated to the current location.
Efforts by the National Museum of Kenya to discover the location of the palace has been unsuccessful despite several archeological studies.
The old Malindi town is easily noticed by the number of old buildings with unique architectural designs and stretches from the Portuguese chapel to the point where the Malindi Heritage Museum is located.
The chapel was built in around 1498 by Vasco da Gama and his team. It was a place of prayer and also burying their dead.
It measures five-by-five metres square and has white walls made of coral rocks and sand.
There is also security window in one wall that was used to look out for enemies across the ocean.
It hosts 36 graves of sailors and prominent people in the compound; including those of Malindi pioneer Commander Lawford of Lawfords Hotel, first Malindi District Commissioner J. Bell Smith who died on September 1, 1894 and Charles Arnold Frank Matthews, who was buried in 1968, among others.
The chapel is sometimes used by local Catholic churches for special masses once or twice per month in remembrance of St. Francis Xavier. The Malindi Catholic Cathedral is named after him.
“We know Portugal has a lot of interests because in 1998 there was celebration of 600 years of Vasco da Gama visit to Malindi and their embassy in Nairobi was really involved,” said the librarian. 

whatsapp image 2023-03-23 at 17.06.51.jpegamboseli
amboara.jpeg
saf.jpeg
saf.jpegche.jpegch.jpeg
c.jpegff.jpeg
f.jpegg.jpegggg.jpeg
fl.jpeg
fl.jpegmmm.jpegmm.jpeg
m.jpegma.jpegmmmm.jpeg
md.jpeg
md.jpegrr.jpeg
r.jpegsss.jpeg
ss.jpegttt.jpegtt.jpeg
t.jpegts.jpegtss.jpeg
vv.jpeg